RMIT University sensor technology research for improve health in aged care

Wednesday 28 September 2022
RMIT’s Micro Nano Research Facility has developed a nano-scale, flexible material that is being used to create sensors that can be integrated into bedding in aged care facilities providing better insight into the health and wellbeing of patients.
RMIT University sensor technology research for improve health in aged care

Associate Professor Madhu Bhaskaran (centre) and Senator Zed Seselja (right) with researchers and project partners at the Micro Nano Research Facility. Photo: Mark Dadswell, Sleeptite

 

RMIT University researchers have been working on a project to integrate flexible, unbreakable electronics, which were developed by the University’s MicroNano Research Facility, into bedding products for aged care.

The project is part of a $1.7 million Cooperative Research Centres Projects (CRC-P) grant that was awarded to advanced manufacturing company Sleeptite and RMIT to explore non-invasive health care monitoring.

The project brings together a team specialising in sensing, micro-technology, health data analytics and bedding manufacturing to deliver Australian-made products for the aged care and assisted living sectors.

RMIT Associate Professor Madhu Bhaskaran developed the stretchable nano-scale material that is being used to create sensors that will be integrated into bedding. These will provide real-time biometric analysis of the vital signs of patients while they sleep. The team is hoping to deliver a product that is approved for medical use within three years, providing nurses and carers with better insight into the health and wellbeing of patients.

The Centre for Digital Enterprise team visited the RMIT Micro Nano Research Facility this week to look at some of the other innovations the researchers are working on. These include high-tech gas sensing capsules that send data from inside the gut direct to a smart phone, a stretchable nano-scale device that paves the way for smart contact lenses, and wearable sensor patches that detect UV radiation and toxic gases such as hydrogen and nitrogen dioxide.

RMIT has a range of programs in the Health and Biomedical sciences disciplines across pharmaceutical, laboratory and biomedical science fields can change lives and communities.

Ask us more about RMIT programs.

 

Excerpt from RMIT Research News

 

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